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Full text of "Annual Reports of the Superintendents of the Yellowstone National Park, 1928"

ANNUAL REPORTS 



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FOR 

YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL MM 




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The practice of mimeographing the annual reports 
for Yellowstone National Park was begun in 1927 and will 
continue until fUnds are again provided for having them 
printed. As there are a number of collectors who have 
the Yellowstone reports since the first issue and as a 
number of others are interested in having copies of the 
reports for reference purposes seventy five copies of 
the 1928 report have been mimeographed. 

The illustrations in this report are the work of 
Mrs. Marguerite L. Arnold, who for a number of year3 
was a ranger in Yellov/stonp National Park. 



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Horace M. Albri< ' 
Superintendf .• 

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Administrative Department 5 

Animals 12 

Appropriations 5 

Automobile Camps 8 

Birds (migratory ) 15 

Buffalo Ranch 11 

Buildings 

Camps , automobile 

Camps , permanent 18 

Cases tried before U. S. Commissioner 19 

Cooperation with other Government organizations: 
Department of ^gr i cultu r e : 

Bureau of Entomology 20 

Bureau of Public Roads 2 

feather Bureau 

Department of Com me re e : 

Bureau of Fisheries 2 r 

Department o f t he Interior : 

Geological Survey 

Depart me nt of Just ice: 

r*s Court 

Post Office D epartment 19 

" r .-. . r; . rti nt : 

ublic ilea ] th~~ : 

Cul * • on of lund: 

Hay operations 12 



Distinguished Visitors 

Distinguished Visitors (Special Newspaper Storj I '! 

Donatioi.s 21 

Dust Prevention 6 

Educational Committee 22 

Educational Department 17 

Electrical Department 9 

Engineering Department 5 

Fires, forest 10 

Fish Planting 11 

Forest Fires 10 

Franchises and Permits 19 

Geysers, Hot Springs and Other Similar Phenomen a; 

Lower Gepser 3asin 16 

Mammoth Hot Springs 15 

New Geyser 16 

Norris Geyser Sasin 16 

Upper Geyser Basin 17 

'.Vest Thumb Basin 17 

Guide Service 18 

Hay and Hay Ranches 12 

Hospital and Medical Service 21 

House Public Lands Committee 

Improvements by Park Utilities 18 

Insects 15 

Landscape Engineering 

Lecture Service 17 

■hanical Department 10 

Medical Service 

Mosquito Control 

>.tus eurr. 17 

•ural Features of the P rl 

Opening of Park 

Opening of Roads 

Permanent Camps 

Permits 

Pof* Department 

Power Plant 

Predatory Animals 



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Processing 7 

Property a.nd Tranrportat ion 9 

Protection Department i 10 

Public Utilities ,i.... 18 

Revenues 5 

Road Improvement 6 

Road Maintenance 5 

Roadside Cleanup 6 

Sanitation « & 

Senate Public Lands Committee 21 

Snow Removal 6 

Telephone Lines 9 

Trails 10 

Transportation Company IP 

Travel of 1923 Season 

Travel of 1S28 Season (Additional tables) 23 

Trees and Insects 15 

Violations of Law 19 

Weather 2 

'.Vild Animals: 

Antelope 1? 

Bears 14 

Beaver 15 

Buffalo: 

Lamar River Herd 1.' 

Cold Creek-Pelican Flats Herd 12 

Coyotes 12 

Deer 

Elk 

Moose 

Mountain Sheep 12 

Sma 1 1 An i ma la 15 

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HORA : . AL3RTGHT, SUPE 

IE 28, 1919 TO JA] 



ANNUAL REPORT FOR Y 

1 J 2 | 
>rac . bright, Superintendent 



Yellowstone National Park, since our last annual ropcrt, ed 
usual course of presenting new sensations out of the abun :• •• of its 
natural phenomena, developing mere and more facilities f r iblic cor." 
and pleasure, widely increasing its popularity and breaking trave] 
The ye^r has been most successful in every field of activity of 1 e - 
lowstcne organization. 

Tho winter of 1S27-28 was not a particularly severe i • -ds 

were opened in the spring without a great deal of difficulty. As soon 
the north and w^st gates were opened, t>n June 1, the travel r 
in and was continuously on the increase over previous ye„.rs. Wh< 
travel season closed, «ur records indicated an increase* of 30,15' irisitc 
over last year, or about 15 per ce: I . 

The formal opening of the park took place at the western entrance 
at West Yellowstone, Montana, on June 20. The guests of honor and prin- 
cipal speakers were Governors H. C. Baldridgo of Idaho and Geor.-- 
Dem of Utah, Chief Justice Lew L. Galloway of Montana, represents. \ 
Governor cf Montana, Congressman Addison T. Smith of Idaho, Mr. Carl . . 
Gray, President of the Union Pacific Railroad, Mr. T. Joe Jahill, 
miss i oner of Commerce and Industry, of Wyoming, representing the 
of Iff; .-, and Chief Tendey of the Shoshone Indian Peserv in. 

park was most beautiful this yec.r, as the winter 
rains during the months of June and early July saturated the re , and 
the flowers presented a most dr ■ £ul picture durii 
The early rains lessened the fire hazard, but later in the 
. r. weather m-j.de it necessary to t. ke ev r; c i on against this 

.;.' park visitors reported seeing wild animals alo I ays 
• ie early visitors were particularly fortunate in seeing moos* 3 . 
re ever popular and the fishing was good fc-nd gave pie i to 
thousands of people. 

The use of oil as a dust p- ive, started last year, - 

ued in force and it has done a rreat deal to < 

and hc.3 made driving v r b] irk vays considei . 

more ■ .t. 

- . work is ; ng more ^nd 

. r vorab. e C 

ser i fl by the Ranger Na - . 

trips were a y atten Led and 1 
ren one of the most popular • 

I oyer 1 tur trai Is . A c 

»o rk in the nat J b 

*en- .• - • o roughly i se of 1 8 • 

. • - , - . . ■ .. ■ . ■ 



Ranger Station was begun in July under the supervision of Herbert I 
architect for the Laura Spelman Rockefeller Foundation, which Foundation 
has donated v l 18,000 for educational work in this park. 

The most sensational event of the year was the breaking out of the 
new geyser in the Lower Geyser Basin, about five miles from the Fountain 
Ranger Station. The first eruption of this geyser was reported on July 
16 and it still continues to play with even greater force and vigor than 
when first observed. Should the geyser continue to play next year it 
should prove to be one of the greatest park features. Already this 
season thousands have viewed its activity and the press of the country 
has featured it in story and picture. 

The park this summer lias been visited by a great number of prom- 
inent persons. Five United States Senators, Hon. Gerald r. Nye of North 
Dakota, Porter !!. Dale of Vermont, Henry F. ^shurst of Arizona, John 
3. Kendrick of Wyoming and John Thomas of Idaho; twelve United States 
Congressmen, Hon. Addison T. Smith of Idaho, Don B. Colton of Utah, 
Charles E. Winter of .Vyoming, John LI. Evans of Montana, Joseph L. Hooper 
of Michigan, F. D. Letts of Iowa, Scott Leavitt of Montana, S. Harrison 
..Lite of Colorado, Pom A. Yon of Florida, Jonothan I . ! :nwright of New 
York, C. B. Hudspeth and Guinn V.iiiiams of Texas and B. L. French of 
Idaho; three Governors, Honorable H. C. Baldridge of Idaho, George H. Dern 
of Utah and Frank C. Emerson of V.yoming; and four railroad presidents, 
Mr. Carl R. Gray of the Union Pacific, H. a. Scandrett of the C. 
St. P. I: p. Ry., Charles Donnelly of the Northern Pacific and N. 
Howard of the Chicago Great V.'estern Railway viewed the playground's 
wonders. Other prominent visitors included: Honorable John . 3 ^rds, 
Assistant Secretary of the Interior, Edward E. Spafford, National Com- 
mander of the American Legion and Harlan F. Stone, Justice of the United 
States Supreme Court. (A newspaper story regarding Spe?ial Visitors to 
the Park in 192£, issued in December, is added near the end of thi3 re- 
port and made a part hereof). 

. ATHER 

Cool but not unseasonable weather prevailed during Se; I 
"iipitation somewhat above the normal amount. October was rather mild 
with much pleasant weather although precipitation continued above norr 
November averaged above normal in temperature and was an outstanding 
month as to precipitation and weather. The t I precipitation *u9 the 
greatest in twenty ye^rs ~nd measurable amounts of precipil t ion occurred 

ore days than any other month on record. The lack of 
month was unprecedented and it is the only November on record v. a 
clear day. December was decidedly below normal in tempera tu: , rd- 
like conditions prevailed on the sixth and subnormal temp- 
general durj '.he remainder of the month. The . 

of the winter and minimum ten - tures ranging from -27° • to - 
at Gallatin •■ r .re recorded. The minimum tei ' ~- • 

Moderate temperatures prevailed during January, March, al- 

though a few days of rather cold the latl 

of Febru ry. , I le slightly above r rature, i 

the coldest . ps. Precipitation was 



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NEY.' •" "OLD FAITHFUL 



Constructed From Funds Received Fi 
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to Larch with decided departures during Jan nd February. April was 
unseasonably cold und stormy and was fol loved by the warmest Ma; I ->nty 
eight years and with one exception the driest. Both Jai tnd Febr. 
were deficient by more than half the average snowfall while the tot 
April was better than double the normal amount. Snow occurred on only one 
day in May. The seasonal snowfall for the park as a whole was near normal 
and with the exception of ivlnmmoth, no decided monthly departures 
evident. Snov; disappeared from the level at Mammoth at the end of the 
third week in April and early in May at the regular reporting stations. 
Snow of any depth was mostly confined to the high passes at the end of 
May. June was cool and one of the wettest on record. A heavy fall of 
snow - over six inches - occurred on the 17th, making the total for the 
month 7.1 inches as compared with a normal of less than one inch. This 
was the greatest amount for June since 1905. It is the only June on 
record with no cle^r days. July was normal. The first week of August 
was cool and showery and was followed by a moderate heat wave. A record 
maximum temperature was established on the 10th when a temperature 
89 was recorded, exceeding the previous record by about one degree. 
Normal temperatures followed this period and fair, dry weather prevailed 
after the first week with a number of very windy days. 

TRAVEL IN 1928 

Park visitors this year totaled 230,994 as compared with 200,825 
last year, an increase of 30,159. The rail travel figures were 41,697 
as compared with 41,685 last year, an increase of 12. Rail figures by 
entrance gateways, as compared with last year are as follows: 



Gar way 


: 1927 


: 1928 


Gain 




North 
'.'.'est 

East j 
ith 


: 13,772 
: 20,216 
7,588 : 
109 


! 13,021 
• 21,001 : 

7,; 67 
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21 

1 


Dotal : 


41,605 - 


41,697 : 


: 
785 : 



omobile visitors, by entrance gateways, as compared with I 
a 3 foil o . : 



Gates ;.- 


1927 


• 

28 


t 

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st 
Fast 
South 


: 28,770 i 
• 60,375 ; 
: 54,9:. 


• , ' 7 
■ 67,4 fl 

1' , ! • 


11, 

, .20 




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This travel is exclusive of motorcycle and preseason auto visitors. 
A new high record of auto travel was established at all gateways t; 
year. 

The number of cars and visitors reported at the various developed 
public auto camp grounds, during the tourist season of . . , • re as 
follows: Mammoth 31,161 cars and 98,469 campers; Old Faithful 43,909 cars 
and 138,752 campers; Lake 34,906 cars and 110,303 campers; Canyon 29,211 
cars and 92,307 campers; Norris 2,312 cars and 7,306 campers; Madison 
Junction 4,231 cars and 13,370 campers; Thumb 6,157 cars and 19,456 
campers; Tower Falls 3,781 cars and 11,948 campers. In addition, approx- 
imately 15,000 campers used the many undeveloped camp sites along the 
roads. 

The west entrance continues to lead in both rail and private auto- 
mobile travel. The west is also the leading exit gateway, 

'otal Season Travel by Entrance Gateways 
1928 and 1927 





: Rail 


: By Automobile 


: By Mo 1 


torcycle 


:walk 
sing, 


:Pre- 
: season 














: Total 




: Visi- 










rhors 


: vis i- 


: Visi- 


Gateway 


: tors 


, ■._ ,. . 


•Visitors 


Cars 


«Visi tors 


:eback tors 


: tors 


19 2 8 












i 






North 


: 13021 


: 13581 


: 39887 


. 


48 


i 277 


: 2508 


: 741 


West * 


: 21001 


: 20536 


67495 


51 


; 68 


t 284 


• 556 


: 894 ; 


East 


; 7567 


18258< 


53128 


54 


66 


: 274 





: 66035 


South 


: 108 


: 5653 


lo055 j 


10 ! 


14 




. 


19804 


Total 


41697 


58028: 




1! B 


1 36 


: •', . •" 


. i 


. 


19 2 7 


















North 


• 13772 i 


3485: 


28770 ; 


41 : 


52 ■ 


340: 




44264 


West 


• 20216 i 


. 18363: 


60375 : 


50 : 


63 


122: 


3: 


81112 


East 


7588 ! 


17324: 


54953 : 


95 : 


122 : 


. 


: 


62' . 


South 


10 J 


3684! 


11481 : 


13 : 


' 


: . 


64 : 


6 


Total 


41685 : 


-;•■•: c- 


155579 : 




263 • 




L7 





" ie rail visitors accredited to I ■ estern Gateway durj 
tourist season of 1928 consist of 17,408 persons via the Oregon Short 
Line Railway (Union Pacific Syster.), . ,337 via thi . St. P. & P. 

(Gallatin Gateway terminal of I e) and 256 persons from I 

Bozer.an terminal of the Northern Pacific, who also enter I I 
via the Gallatin Route. 

Additional travel figures, as compiled at the end of the tourist 
season and released to the Press in e^rly October, are Included ne 
the end of this report and made a part hen 



AD] [] I JTRATIVE DEPARTMENT 

Headquarters Office ;- Several changes were made in the administrat 
organization of the park during the past fiscal year. On October 16, 
Resident Engineer Merrill F. Daum was promoted to the position of Assist- 
ant Superintendent and placed in charge of finances and accounts and all 
maintenance, repair and construction activities. The purchasing and 
storehouse departments were combined under the purchasing el 11 
transportation was placed under the 'iaster Mechanic. Besides I regular 
personnel of six employees, engaged on the usual duties of timekeeping, 
cost keeping, disbursing, files and general administrative work, three 
temporary clerks were necessary to care for the increased work during I 
summer season. 

Appropriations ;- Appropriations made available since the date of t] 
last report are as follows; 



ACT 


PI"RPOSE 




UNT 






1 


1,R! . 
661,030.7 

23,222.26 




T o t a 1 • 


434, 




i 


,120,1' • .96 



* -,000 reserved for Washington Office expenditures and ,'4,340.01 
an unallotted reserve. 

[evenues for 19?8 t- Funds collected during the fiscal year 192R and 
deposited to the credit of Miscellaneous Receipts in the United States 
Treasury were as follows: 

Franchise and permit fees :.' 105, C. . 

Automobile and motorcycle permit fees 131 , ■ . 

Electric Current ', • .76 

Water Rent 470.88 

ilaneous . 

Total ■: 

ENGINEERING DEPAR'! 



Assistant Resident Engineer 
sition of Resident Engineer October 16, 1327 v rrili : . 
Lloyd C. Regnell was appointed from Civil Serv ; ■■ 
Engineer. 

Road Main* r.v.-e ;- The park road 
road designated as foil-;. nd Loop 140.7 miles, n- 

necting road3 73.1 miles, sec 
miles. In addition to the maintf 



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park forces maintained 28 miles of road in the Shoshorv I onal Forest 
east of the Park, and 30 miles of road in the Teton National Forest 
south of the park. Sixteen crews of from five to ten men, with on^ or 
two tea:ns, a small dump truck and a horse-drawn or motor-driven 
maintained the roads in the park and three similar sized ere 
tained the roads outside the park. In addition there were two heav; 
tractors and graders used for spring and fall maintenance. This year we 
have added one more power grader to our maintenance equipment. 

Dust Prevention :- Due to weather conditions it was ii isible to 
start our oiling for dust prevention as early as we would have liked to 
and for that reason the work was carried on all during the heavy sumr. ■ c 
traffic. 180 miles of road were oiled to varying widths and with from 
two to three applications of heavy road oil at the rate of l/6 gallon 
per square yeard. The ntunber of applications varied to a certain ext 
with the volume of traffic using the road. 

Ten war surplus F.W.D.'s with welded ammunition bodies of 70) gal- 
lons capacity each and six new White trucks with insulated tanks of 
1,000 gallons capacity each v/ere used to freight the oil from our heat- 
ing plant alongside the tracks at Gardiner to the oil distributor. 
Approximately 500,000 gallons of oil were used this year. 

Snow Removal ;- The snow removal problem was much easier this year 
due to favorable weather conditions. The roads into the r>i.rk were 
opened to trafiic, on the west side June 1, and on the east side June 
: . Sylvan Pass was opened to traffic the ni^ht of June 17. Dunr^ven 
Puss was opened to traffic June 18. The south entrance road v.as opened 
to traffic June 16 and the 1 . i .;hburn ro^d was opened July 1. 

toad Improvement ;- Road reconstruction continx-ed as outlined 1 
year with the completion of three of the projects, the continuation of 

•ee projects and the initiation of three others. Tnere are as fol- 
lows: 

Project 1-A, Mammoth-IIorris Junction:- Recons- traction of th( 
features of this road was continued rk forces. A 1/2 yard ! 
shovel, 2 four yard trucks, 1 small compressor were added to the ) o 
drawn equipment used upon this project. Approx'. 

a project will be graded this year. V.nere neces 
will be applied. 

Project l- 'r, :.'orris June tion-l' adi a on J 1 . 
reconstruction "cf 4 miles of t: " let 

by the Bureau of Public Roads to the Morrison-Knudsen Company of 
Idaho, at an approximate cost of $122,000. Work has | 
rapidly wi1 I lc delay to trai . 

cks, besides other small equipment, upon 1 

which will be completed this fall. 

Projee , Flrel ad : - it, 2.4 

complex ii ed to tra of • 



Since that tine the road has been given a heavy oiling and semi-processed 

it dustless. This oroject was built entirely I h park for 
and was first st rted in 1916 by the i».rmy Engineers. 

Proje ct 1- 0, Ca nyon Junc tion- To wer Jun ction ;- This project, l-l/2 
miles long, was constructed and suriaced by park forces and was completed 
late last fall. It was thrown open to traffic this sprin, . 

Project No, 3, Madison Junction- West Y ellowstone; - This project 
approximately 1 mile long, with roadside cleanup over 6 miles of road 
built by park forces and opened to traffic this spring. Only the 
worst sections of this road were rebuilt. 

Project 5-B, East Ent rance-Sylvan Pass:- A contract for the re- 
construction of 4 miles of this road was let this spring by the Bureau 
of Public Roads to the Morrison-Knudsen Company of Boise, Idaho, for 
a total cost of approximately .^281,000. Good progress is being made 
upon this work with no trouble to traffic. This section will not be 
used until the entire project is completed from the entrance to the pass. 

Project 5-C, Cub Creek Section of East Entrance Roa d;- This project 
is being constructed by the Lorrison-Knudsen Company under the supervi- 
sion of the 3ureau of Public Roads. Considerable traffic interruption 
occurred this spring due to the nature of the road material and the bad 
weather. This project will be completed this fall. Four of the six 
miles of the new work was opened to traffic in August. 

Project 6-A, .Vest Gallatin Road :- This project, which is being re- 
constructed by the Pioneer Construction Company of Bozeman, Montana, 
under the supervision of the Bureau of Public Roads, is practically com- 
pleted except for the bridge across the West Gallatin River. It will be 
completed this fall. 

Project 6-?, Grayling Creek Section of ' ■ ..--st Gallatin Roa : ; - 
Six miles of this road is being reconstructed with \ I rc< . ',.ork 
started June 15. Equipment on this work consists of a 1-yard Osgood 
gas shovel, 2 2-yard dump trucks, 1 tractor and heavy grader, 1 air 
compressor, drill sharpener and furnace and miscellaneous small tools. 
Good progress is being made and the work may be completed this year. 

Processing :- Two miles of the Lake Shore road have been processed 
si-iilur to the method used in California. It is planned to use thi3 

on the remaining 10 miles of the project and upon \ 
tion Point road this fall. The work is being uo:. 
the dust prevention work, using the 3ame tank eq 
of oil. T#o tractors and four heavy graders are used to mix the 
and surfacing, 

Bui] : I ■. -3 ;- One mess house and three bunkhouser 
structed for use of our maintenance road crews a.1 .ison Ju 
Norris Junction and Lewis River, Two standard sr. 
been constructed for th< -jIs ar 

Bridge. One standard duplex ranger 8 
South Entrance. This building will house the per 



stationed there ail year round for fire and game patrols and f< i 
temporary summer ranger checkers. One additional set of 
been constructed at headquarters out of the old storehouse building. 
Another one will be completed this fall, thus utilizing the three old 
storehouses to the fullest extent. Considerable improvement has been 
made in the storehouse and commissary with additional bins and she.. 
The painting program was continued this year and three .nore buildings 
were painted on the outside a stone gray color. 

LANDS Ci^PE ENGINEER" 

The landscape and planning problems of the park were thorouf. 
?red by the Chief Landscape Engineer T. C. Vint and his assistant, 
K. C. MeCarter. In addition, Mr. Vitale of the Fine Arts Commissi 
made a very thorough report upon the location of the various museums 
and other interlocking subjects. The site at Old Faithful v.as settled 
and the museum building is now in the course of construction. The 
site at Mammoth Hot Springs has been temporarily located and will be 
built upon next spring. 

Roadside Cleanup :- The cleanup of the roadsides has continued this 
year with both government funds and donations. The work consisted of 
completing the cleanup of the road from Canyon Junction to West Ph. 
and of six miles between West Yellowstone and lladison Junction. Our 

) r maintenance crews have kept the completed sections of the road 
free from debris. I.iuch has been done by our forces in the removal of 
the old sprinkler tanks and systems in making our roadsides more si 
ly. The road reconstruction projects mentioned earlier in this report 
have roadside cleanup as part of the cost of construction rut nothing 
will be done on the projects until the contract work is eomplet . 
landscaping of the grounds was done around our residences at Mammoth 
this year with great success. The park operators did vory little of 

rk pending a general landscape plan being prepared by the Lai L- 
scape Department. 



I TAT I ON DEPARTMENT 

3 work is carried on under the supervision of . . Common ( 
the U. S. Public Health Service and under the direct charge of our Ma - 
ter Plumber. A thorough inspection was made e pant aeasoi. 
all operations park and definite program was laid out for tJ 
year' 3 and next year's work. 

Public Auto Camp l> ■■ »nt:~ This work c 

of tables, fireplaces, roads, and t«ee protection in the 

Faith: , . «jnb, Lake and Fishing Bridge auto camps 

2 standard comfort stations in the Old 
Thumb auto camp and one in the Fishing Bridge . 
incinerator was constructed and is in 
for the garbage from the hotel, lodg' , tores, : 
and one is under con. jn at Lak f :' r -r: • •' :i3po3al '.: 



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The water and sewer system has been extended in the various camps 
to care for the increased area of the cumps and at LSunmoth a nev: 4-inch 
water main replaced the old 2-inch main that proved inadequate to meet 
the demands of the larger camp. The water supply lines at liiammoth have 
been giving considerable difficulty this year as they are leaky and un- 
able to carry the volume of water necessary to the operation of our 
power plant and our water system. 

Mosquito Control ;- Fifteen hundred gallons of light oil was sprayed 
over pools adjacent to our various auto camps this spring in an effort 
to control the mosquito nuisance but with small success due to the con- 
tinued rains. Extensive drainage ditching is being done this fall to 
eliminate these pools. 

Misce l laneous t- Six septic tanks with chlorinators and four without 
were operated during the past season. Flans have been completed for a 
new sewer system at headquarters. 

ELECTRICAL DEPA. 

Considerable difficulty has been experienced under peak loads this 
year due to the po.ir condition of the turbines and the insufficient 
water supply in the power plant at headquarters. The peak load for the 
year was 240 K.W. plus or in excess of the meters on the switchboard. 

1926-7 1927-8 

Total production in kilowatt hours.... 702,092 736,550. 

Sold to park operators 92,892 98,519.5 

Line loss and used by t r *. in 

residences, or for power and street 

lighting 609,200 638,030.5 

The power plant is operated all year round three shifts per da; . 
The auto camp at Pishing Bridge was wired for street lights and for 

* in the government buildings. Additional street lights were 
placed in the Old Faithful Auto Camp. 

T elephone system :- Besides the usual niuintenance of the telephone 
system, Lch as nore difficult this year due to the continued st 
the line fro. 10th to Tower Junctioi. rebuilt this year, using 
ced<-r poles instead of the n poles which decay so rapidly. A 
line from Lewis Lak :t. Sheridan was built for fire patrol work, 
distance of eight miles. The number of miles of circuit m. 
our forces total 477. 

PROPERTY 

The storehouse and purchasing depar" 

-ling clerk resulted a much cloaer cue - 

en the two activities. Supplies to the value of 
^122,000 and equipment tc , 30 h 

furnished to r>ur various activ . 



. 

MECHANICAL DEPARTMENT 

Five cars, six motorcycles, 66 trucks of varying types and capac- 
ities, 10 tractors, 37 graders (horse-drawn and power), 60 wagons and 
one steam shovel, 2 compressors, and miscellaneous small tools, includ- 
ing tents, stoves and camp equipment have been maintained, repaired and 
operated by this department. Six trucks and 3 cars were painted with 
Duco lacquer, a Park Service green. A freight fleet of 13 trucks and 
an oil tank fleet of 16 trucks have been operated by this department 
in carrying equipment, material and supplies and road crews into the 
park. 

PROTECTION DEPARTMENT 

Personnel consists of the Chief Park Ranger, 4 Assistants Ch I 
Park Ranger, 26 park rangers, permanent, and 58 park rangers, temporary 
(employed annually for summer season service, period of service about 
90 days ) . 

'.'■"inter Activities :- The fall, winter and spring season activities 
have consisted principally of regular end special patrols for the obser- 
vation and protection of wild life and the natural features of the park, 
the capture and shipment of buffalo and elk, predatory animal hunting, 
repairs and maintenance to telephone lines, buildings and equipment, 
trail maintenance and repair, observing and reporting weather conditions 
and water gage heights in cooperation with the Weather Bureau and the 
Water Resources Branch of the U. S. Geological Survey. Other activities 
have consisted of wild animal feeding at the various hay ranches and the 
care and feeding of the Park Service and ranger horses at their winter 
feed grounds. 

Summer Season Activities :- The principal activities during the 
tourist season have consisted of checking entrance and exit travel, 
traffic regulation and control, information and communication, guide 
and lecture service, report compilation, trail construction, maintenance 
and repair, showshoe cabin and ranger station construction, and patrol? 
for the prevention and control of forest fires. Special patrols ai 
also effective throughout the tourist season for the protection of the 
hot springs and geyser formations and other natural features of the park. 

'orest Fires ;- Precipitation was unusually heavy during June and 
July and there was no serious fire hazard until aft- r /-. * -ast l3t. Pre- 
cipitation was light during August. There wus a high percentage of 
sunshine and tempera tures were in excess of normal during most of the 
month. Several roadside fires occurred that were promptly ex1 
with slight loss. More serious fires occurred at points more difficult 
of access. Moderate expense and some 103s of live timber resulted but 
in each instance the fire was extinguished wil remarkable promptness 
and very little loss. 

Trail Construction, .V^int-.:. .■ ■ I -_^_ t:- N i t] 1 con- 
struction has consisted of the following! " over 
as "Elephants Back" in vicinit; ollowstone Lake Station and 4 miles 



11 

from Fishing Bridge to Squaw Lake. The tot 11 mileage, exclusive 
of game tr. ils used by rangers on patrol, is approximately 898 miles. 
The entire trail system has been cleared of down timber and repaired. 
The trail from South Riverside Cabin tc if -lo Lake, distance 14 miles, 
has been reblazed. 

Fish ?1: siting ;- Fish planting activities during the year with com- 
parable figures for 1926 and 1927 are noted as follows: 





19 2 6 


13 2 7 


1 ■ 


Total collection of black ; 
spotted trout eggs from : 


17,000,000 : 
5,891,000 

8,494,000 


■ 13,313,000 
5,113,000 
5,983,000 i 


23,684,000 


Number of e~gs collected in 
park, hatched and returned ; 
to park waters or planted j 


8,347,000 


Total fish shipped to out- : 




Total eggs shipped to out- : 


• 10,614,000 




14,385,000 


11,096,000 


1^,961,00^ 


Total number of fish planted : 

in park waters ! 

Black spotted trout collect- ; 

Brook trout received from 
Bozeman, Montana hatchery 

Loch Leven trout received 
from Bozeman, Montana 

Rainbow trout received from 
Bozeru , .tana hatcher- 
Rainbow trout received from 
Saratoga, Wyo. hatchery... 


5,891,000 ■ 


5,113,000 ! 
■ ,?50 

52,500 - 


,.47,000 
,100 

71,500 
98,800 


Total h 


5 6 
• » - L » 


5,2 , 


, 



Loss on egga and fry this season: , • , 

BUFFALO RANCH OPERj 

The activities at the 3uffalo Ranc 
ncipally of I : r and keep of rd whi- 
of 985 tons of hay as compared with ! 
■ tal of 950 tons of hay . -.ble f 
Other activities have included new construction of 

lows: 1 hay corral, 100x1 feet, i hay jorral, - , 1 open r 

abbatoir 3Bxl2 feet with concrete flooring 




>.'■ \ 








f/.>fti./ : >■ 

0t\ ■ . 






CO 
L 
ft 



BUFFALO 

Thero aro now over a thousand of - als 
in Yellowstone National Par 



fencing, 800 posts and 6 strands of wire were used, * . 
fencing, consisting of 90 panels, 14 fpet long and 7 rails high. All 
buffalo corrals were rebuilt during the year and 73 acres of land was 
plowed and reseeded with timothy and clover. 

Twenty-eight buffalo were captured and crated for shipment during 
the year, 23 steers were slaughtered and sold for market purposes, an 
outlaw bull was destroyed by the Chief Park Ranger, 2 decrepit old 
animals failed to survive the winter season, and a I ly disabled 
calf was destroyed. 

'•' RANCH OPERATIONS 

V/ild animal and horse feeding at the Slough Creek, Yancey and 
Gardiner ranches accounted for 730,74 tons of hay. There is a balance 
of 108 tons of old hay now on hand. The yield this year at the above 
named ranches was 626 tons; total tonnage 734. Other activities have 
consisted of maintenance and repairs of buildings, property ;md equip- 
ment. 

PREDATORY ANIMALS 

Two hundred and eighty four coyotes were destroyed during the 
year, as compared with 238 last year and 243 the year next preceding. 

NATURAL FEATURES OF THE P^RK 

Forest and plant life, thermal activities and wild life conditions 
have been observed and reported by the park natural I I i angers 
roughout the year. Their observations are briefly noted as foil 
wild animal and forage conditions have been good except as not' . • - 
in. 

3uffalo - Lamar River Herd :- The herd total or. I . 1, exclur . 
of the 1929 calf crop, was 896," consisting of 266 bulls, 176 steers 
and 454 cows ^nd heifers. The latest count of the 1923 calf crop se- 
cured on July 29th was 100. 

Buffalo - Cold Creek-Pelican Creek Herd :- The counts submitted 
rangers in Pel n ry 1920 were the largest secured rii the ; 
total of these counts was 61 as compared with 72 in December . our 
•inter kills, consisting of a bull, 2 cows and 1 call . . 

ing the February 1923 patrols. ::r-rd and forage cc . 
that time. The herd total is estimated at 100. 

■:ntain Sheep :- One hundred ' ". 

9, the largest count of the year as compar 
■.own losses during the year consist i I lied b; at 

failed to survive the scabies mites and hair lung • 
determined by laboratory examination. 
as far short jf the actual losses tl 
during the year. All reports of sheep tunds observed »nd 



of 

Of 



13 



August 1928 are far more favorable than earlier in t] year. Sheep 
conditions are apparently good at this time. The estimated total wj 
in the park is 500. 

Antelope :- The largest count of the year was secured in Decemb< r 
1927, the total being 526. The count immediately prior to their spring 
season drift (February 1928) was 442; this count was 199 less than the 
maximum count of last year. The known losses from all causes during 
the year are as follows: Palled by coyotes 8, accident;. 
kills 4, unlawfully killed by hunters in 'iontana 5; total 19. Uncon- 
firmed reports of antelope on a range north of Livingston, Kfon 
supported by the apparent decrease in the Yellowstone herd. There is 
every reason to consider that there has been some loss by migration 
within the past eighteen months. Herd conditions are excellent and 
all reports indicate a normal increase this year. The estimated total 
at this time is 625. Reports from Wyoming during the hunting season 
last fall (1927) account for the killing of 150 of the Greybull herd. 
This was the first open season on antelope in V.'yoming in recent years. 
The security of the Yellowstone was in no way affected by the open 
season in Wyoming last year. 

.Yoose:- Roadside appearances since late in June have been less 
frequent than last year but actual counts, totaling 111 in the Upper 
Yellowstone, Sylvan Pass, Snake River, Gallatin, Upper Slough Creek, 
Soda Butte Creek, Upper Lamar River, Tower Falls, Grayling Creek, 

ris, Itemrr.oth and Firehole Districts, indicate their wide distribu- 
tion. This is the largest actual count since 1925 when a total of 
170 was reported. The known losses during the past year were as fol- 
lows: Lawfully killed by hunters in Wyoming 11, unlawfully killed by 
hunters in Montana 2, winter kills 1, total 14, as compared with a 
total loss of 40 last year. There is an estimated total of 650 in 
the park at this time. Yoose conditions are excellent. 

Deer ;- The largest count secured during the year was 822 as 
compared with 683 last year and 798 in 1926. Losses occurred as fol- 
lows: Killed by coyotes 33, winter kills 18, to -al 51, as compa r 
with 61 last year. Hunters killed 97 on hunting areas bordering tl 
park as compared with 110 last year. Herd conditions are excellent 
and there is an estimated total of 2,000 mule deer in the park and at 
nearby points along the Yellowstone and Gallatin Rivers. 

Elk ;- Special observations and counts of the no: - elk herd 
indicate a natural decrease since the close of Febr. r; 7. The 
official count secured at that wa9 17,. , 
the 1927 calf crop estimated at 1653 made an est: I I I I of 
19,000 at the beginning of the hunting season Last 
official count submitted on April 16 of this ye^r was 12, . , 
an apparent loss of 6,146 Binci rch 1, 1927. • • . of 

■ Forest Service, State Game Department of .Voi. 
Park rangers cooperated in securing the count. "ols 

of the winter elk range in the north district of the pai ■ ■ 
made by Mr. 1 iam Rush of the Forest Service, r of 



r 



the I Ion tana State Fish and Game Department, and Sam T. , 
Hanger of Yellowstone National Park, durir. y 7 to 12, In- 

clusive. Two thousand one hundred twerr . :it elk, consisting of 
2,099 adults and 29 calves were counted du r I .e. This ratio 
indicates that there were less than 300 calves in the entire no:" 
elk herd on Hay 15, 1928, as compared with an es I of 

1,653 at the beginning of the 1927 hu. jeason. It rs from 
the counts and observations that the 1927 calf crop has been almost a 
total loss. Large numbers were killed during the hunt ason and 
heavy losses no doubt occurred during the wea.. od caused by 
weakness and low vitality resulting from the heavy snowfall and un- 
usually severe blizzard conditions of tne early winter. The reported 
losses since early last fall are as follows: Killed by hunters .. 
shipments for stocking purposes 184, winter kills 365, total 2,238. 
Additional heavy losses have no doubt occurred at distant and isola 
points as practically all winter losses reported occurred along or 
near the trails. Fifteen hundred twenty of our winter losses were 
caused by hunters along the north line, which is by far the largest 
kill of the past five years. The second largest kill during this 
period was 1,090 in 1926. The estimated total of the northern elk 
(including the Madison and Gallatin herds) is 14,150. Unconfirmed 
reports of elk hilled in the Jackson Hole District during the hunting 
season of 1927 place the total at approximately 1,000. This herd is 
not identified with the Yellowstone or northern herd. 

Forage conditions in the park have been generally good throughout 
the year with the exception of a period of several weeks during the 

rly winter when unusually heavy snow depths, wind crust and blizzard 
conditions made the forage, although abundant, inaccessible with re- 
sultant heavy losses among the elk. Buffalo feeding was started on 
January 8 and was concluded on April 24. Elk feedi' started at 
the Slough Creek and Gardiner Ranches on January 19 and 25, respective- 
ly. There are 1,684 tons of hay available for wild animal feed; 
during the approaching winter season which together with the unusui. 
heavy forage crop is believed entirely sui: t for the wild life re- 
ents next yeur. 

Sears, bl^ck and brown :- Recent counts of the bear:- 
are :■ i» yon District 91, Lake District 60, r is 

District 25, Thumb District 23, Old Faithfu District 16, 
District 12, total 227, including 52 cubs. The I t counl .red 
last year was 174, including 41 cubs. ! n on actu 

The total irumber of black and brown bears in I 
present time is believed to be about 350. 

Bears, grizzly : - Recent I 
given as follows: Canyon District 68, Yellowstone - 
Old Faithful District 3, tc 3, includl 

with a maximum count of 74 la3t year, inc] . Increase 

she. actual count.-. . . The total i 
the park at this time is estimated at 140. 
of both species show d increase ts < rs. 



15 

Beaver :- Beaver activities are regarded as normal on comparison 
with reports of previous years. There has been no apparent increase 
or decrease in their numbers or in the range or extent of their ac- 
tivities . 

Other Small rinimals :- Abundant signs and occasional appearances 
of marten, mink, weasel, skunk, otter and fox have been noted by ran- 
gers on winter season patrols. Porcupines, badgers, etc. are also 
numerous and widely distributed throughout the park. 

Migratory 3irds ;- Ducks and geese have been observed in variable 
numbers on all the lakes and streams. Swans are occasionally seen 
along the Yellowstone River between Lake and Canyon and along the 
Firehole River in the Fountain District. V/ater fowl counts have been 
submitted monthly to the Bureau of Biological Survey, Washington, D.C., 
pursuant to a cooperative agreement effective beginning in July 1927. 

Trees and Insects :- The recommendations and suggestions of Dr. 
H. E. Burke, v. ho was in charge of forest insect control work in Yel- 
lowstone Park last year, have been carefully and fully complied with, 
particularly regarding all infested trees designated for treatment. 
The lodgepole needletyer infestation in the West Yellowstone district 
was inspected by Dr. Svenden of the Bureau of Entomology at the be- 
ginning of the tourist season and he found conditions so greatly im- 
proved that he did not regard spraying as necessary this year. An 
additional inspection and further recommendations will probably be 
made in due course this fall. 

:'SSRS AND HOT SPRINGS 

Kftmmojbh Hot Sprin gs;- During the fall of 1926 there was a gradual 
cessation of activities over the entire hot springs region at Mammoth. 
However, the fall of 1927 found these springs for the most part be- 
coming active ajain, and by July, 1928, the springs one by one had i - 

L.red. Narrow Gauge Terrace is now the nore interesting than it 
has been for a number of years; Minerva Terrace, which failed the 1 
week of August in 1927 and again in April, 1928, became more active as 

ason advanced and stalactites and stalagmites are forming or : 
more; Old Hymen Terrace which was slightly active during the spring and 
early sur_- r . is become bone-dry; increased activity of the Blue Springs 

caused a large flow of water to be formed immed . south 
Jupiter Terraces. Bath Lake, which has been dry since Octob r 1926, 
has shown increased activity by the presence of steam and rumblings 
underground. The old Bath House located by it has I .ng 

the siimmer of 1928 because of its unsightlincss and uselessness. 
Also, the old springboard ^3 been done ri th and v.hat was oi 
the bottom of the lake has been cleaned of logs bris. *as 
no marked decrease in activity of the springs with thi- cor 
fall of 1927 and it was not until spring that 

of the usual decrease in activity, but th< flow ol the 

springs during the summer was not unusual 't. Rabbits, 

pine squirrels, porcupine, deer, elk and coyotes 
formations during I i titer. The bat3, * it th< 's 



16 

Kitchen during the summer time, were not observed there fr I te Octo- 
ber until in June, Pew birds were found smothered in the res 
and hollows which are filled with carbon-dioxide. During thi ist 

-on the terrace trail was well policed and maintained by the men on 
formation patrol. The increase in hot springs activity during the 
past year has made the Terrace Trail a thing of beauty arid v.ond' c 
the increased attendance of the guide parties have found this trail a 
very interesting and enjoyable one. The Geophysical Laboratory of the 

.egie Institution of Washington, D. C, has been engaged in making 
chemical analyses of the various waters found in the springs with a 
more thorough explanation of the deposits in mind. 

Norris Geyser Basin ;- This basin has remained true to type in 
that there has occurred an amount of shifting and variation which 
characterizes it. The steam vent, Black Growler, furnished an intt r- 
esting change in temperature, as when recorded in May its temperature 
had dropped to 100.5 degrees - 36 degrees below the recorded temper- 
ature of February. However, its activity has not decreased appre- 
ciably. Most of the springs and geysers have been characterized 
their irregularity. 

Lower Ceyser Basin :- The Fountain Paint Pot, formerly known as 
.•'... r ^int Fots, located in this basin, was observed to be much 
more active and beautiful during the winter months than during the 
summer. In March, 192S, its activity extended over an area twice 
the size of that occupied during the summer of 1927. Fountain Gevser 
was observed in eruption on June 20 and again on July, 1929. These 
are the only reported emotions of Fountain Geyser during a period of 
three years. At this basin is located the new geyser which lias re- 
ceived such widespread publicity in the press of our count :\ . 
was first observed by Ranger Roy G. Dale and Frederick W. .vc- i •.• r 
from Fountain Ranger Station on July 10. Four da;-s c Ranger Dale 
went to the geyser and was the first to see it play. It is located 
about 5 miles from the Fountain Ranger Station. A sign has been 
placed on the right-hand side of the Fountain freight road, about 
two miles from the Fountain Ranger Station, pointing to the direction 
of the geyser. Turning here a tourist simply follows the automobile 
tracks through the meadows for about 2 miles. The trail ber 
the point where the cars are parked and the geyser is three- four - 
of a mile beyond. The following facts should be noted concerning this 
new geyser: o^ eruption 80 to 150 f« I , riod 4 to 6 hoi. , 
interval 10 to 14-l/2 hours. The geyser plays in a series of sy r1 , 
averaging about 18 per minute. The last hour of 

most violent and the greatest h ' is attained t that 1 . The 
geyser plays from a vent approximately 2-l/2 x 9-1/2 • - , but 
force of the eruption and the erosion has « 

.• vent approximately 90 x 14 b. .gs 

and . ts are locatea • b and seem to bi con- 

nec bed bh activity of th Ls geyser. ' 

below t'ne surfac , one foot d r bl 

-etofore has been considered 
tempera ture at the bottom is 120 . ..... 

of the Gf Leal Laboratory of the Carnegie ington, 

D. C. reports seeing a si r at this point last ; but or . 



* I-IU tAKY 1V 

recently has it broken out in such tremendous proportions. 

geyser has not officially h . . imcd but several appropriate 

have been suggested, including "Geyser of the Woods", " r .-", 

"Twin Buttes Go; 3 r" and "Valley Geyser". 

U pper Geyser Basin :- An interesting comparison is afford 
this basin. During the previous years the 1 .pted on t] r 

occasions but was inactive all this year until September 9th and 10th. 
Giant Geyser was inactive during the last thr<~e and if months 
of 1926 but played three times during March, 1928, and :ly 
once a month during the whole year. The Beehive erupted but once 
during the fall, winter and spring of 1926-27, but erupted a nu::btr 
of times durin ; the spring of 1928. There se^ms to be little change 
in the eruptions of Old Faithful Geyser. During December, 1J27, the 
intervals were from 48 to 54 minutes and to a height of 80 to 150 
feet. Castle Geyser played for five successive days, October 2C 
25, 1927. On August 15, 1928, Dr. G^o. C. Ruhle, one of the ranger- 
naturalists, reported what he believed to be a new gey- r, The first 
observed eruption lasted for about 20 minutes and was of a fount 
type, with many rockets, rising to a height of 30 feet or over. A 
similar eruption was observed by Head Ranger Naturalisl U raid E. 
Marsh the. following day. This geyser is located about 150 feet north- 
west by north of Rocket Geyser and previously acted as an overflow for 
Grotto and Rocket when they were in eruption. The geyser, it seems, 
was reported in 1925 and in 1927, but the eruption of August 15th was 
the first recorded for the 1928 season. 

7 --.j 3asi;: :- V.o marked : ■ d in - 

ther a] 3tivities at thi tfest Thumb of Yellowstone La. . 

EDUCATI ONAL DEPART] 3N T 

The Information Office at Park !!ead. ; . r1 rs Lsitod b; 
68,497 people during this season. There has 

ir as is seen by 32,894 visitors in 1926 and 57,438 in . 
this office it was possible to secure free gov . t publicatir-: , 
of which 4,490 pieces were distributed, as well as 9,010 Ld, 

uding 3,223 portfolios. This may be- compai 
last year (1927) .. were 5, 

1,486 portfolios. re sold in addition t »ome 
books of other publishers. 

The visitors to the Museum this .. 
with the miniature (one-eighth lifo-siz- 
there. These four groups - one of the b 
two of the bears - completed by fc. 

Sawyer last winl r and h i i • k ~ 

grounds to produce a most realist: ?t. 

Lecture S rv : - :- Thi 3 r n 
of thr< I stur 1 ea ■ 

,092. I r re also thr 
attend L 120, rsons; two at 



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raBB^^iCEr^^ . • — u ,-:—•; Z':~" K 



Located About : Lies From Fountain Ranger S1 I 
First Observed By Par . Dal« on 

ght of r . • 
Length oJ tions From 4 tc 6 - 
Eruptions 



la 

26,645 persons; 43,893 persons listened to the two lectures provided 
at Canyon, 4,929 heard the lectures at Tower Falls and C.-mp Roosevelt, 
There were in addition lectures at the auto camps at West Thumb and 
Fishing Bridge with an approximate attendance of 3,260 and 15, ICO 
respectively. The lectures on top of Mt. Washburn, 3! in numb- p, 
were given to approximately 14,105 persons. In comparison the fol- 
lowing totals for last year are presented: Mammoth 47,615, Old Faith- 
ful 126,567, Lake 18,855, Canyon 20,585, Tower falls 2,047. 

Guide Service :- During the season of 1928 the formations a1 
moth Hot Springs and Old Faithful could be seen on two re .i.r . ;.ie 
parties daily. There were established for the first time I 
four guide parties at Canyon. Additional guide service was furnished 
on special request. Nature guide service was established ^mmoth 
Hot Springs, Old Faithful, Tower Falls and Yellowstone Lake, one 
party daily being the regular routine. The totals on guide service 
are as follows: Mammoth Hot Springs 19,175, Old Faithful 37/ . , 
Yellowstone Lake 6,415, Canyon 15,411, rower Falls 821. The grand 
total was 79,405. These totals may be compared to the totals for 
1927 which were: Mammoth Hot Springs 15,623; Old Faithful 32,906; 
Yellowstone Lake 5,295; Tower Falls 1,063; grand total being 52,906. 

IMPROVEMENT BY PUBLIC UTILITIES AND INDIVIDUAL OPERATORS 

Yellov.stone Park Camps Company :- Mammoth - Constructed 35 per- 
manent cabins, 34 size 12x12, one size 12x20, and new flush toilet 
building and equipment. 

Old Faithful *- Completed construction of main lodge building 
and 100 new permanent lodges. Constructed five new permanent lodges. 
Installed new fire equipment. Public Automobile Camp . - Constructed 
85 new tent frames, and extended water and street light lines to dif- 
ferent parts of camp grounds. 

Lake ;- Constructed 40 permanent lodges, new comfort station and 
3 new fire hose houses and equipment. Fishing Bridge Automobile C.--r: . 
Constructed 5 new tent frames with new canvas * •■ '. i . 

Canyon :- Constructed new 10,000 gallon water tank, 20 foot ad 
tion to Curio Shop, and 40 permanent log and frame lodges. 

Yellov.ston e Park Tr ansportation Company :- G ler - Purchased 
new 5-ton truck", 1 Ford roadster, 1 Lincoln t 

crank shaft grinder, 1 Heald cylinder grinder ' ing 

equipment. 

Old Faithful :- Constracted new 60 horse barn for saddle horses 
and new storage garage, 208x212. 

Yellowstone P?.:\ -el Com ; - .:.. :- >th - Ins1 
equipment and miscellaneous otel« 



Old Faithfu l;- ^dcied 20 rooms to g pis' 6 roon. 

boys' dormitory and completed new 5-room house 
neers and firemen. 

Canyon : Installed new 200 h >r 8 ; ower boiler us 

machinery and equipment for dining room. 

Yel lowstone Park Boat Company :- Purchased 1 new 18-foot Lead< r 
launch and 18 Mullins metal rowboats. 

Ceo- ■ hittaker, merchant :- Mammoth - All build I ainted 
and remodeled. Inst. lied branch U. S. Post office in Canyon store. 

Haynes Picture Shoos, Inc .:- Constructed building 60x60 feet in 
size at Fishing Bridge automobile camp to house Keynes' picture shop, 
mess and photo finishing plant, two stories and garage integral; also 
built warehouse 32 x 100 feet, including stock room and cold storage 
room and commissary in rear of J.Iammoth Hotel. Rebuilt and enlarged 
building at Mammoth for residence. 

Henry P. 3rothers, baths ;- Installed 2 compartment laundry tubs 
in automobile camp ground, also electric irons and boards. 

C. ... :■ :::ilton, merchant :- Started work on constructing new store 
building at Fishing Bridge and Old Faithful auto - 

Par-: Cur io Sh op:- Constructed lar^e cafeteria buil . mnoth 
auto camp. 

FRANC HIS 3S ... I'S 

Fourteen saddle horse permits were issued , • 

permits to t tion pictures and 35 tr< " ts. 

DEPART .'F JUSTICE - U. 3. ISS1 I -'S CC 

Honorable John '■..'. ?.:eldrum, Commissioner 
Proceedings were h 1 cases durin 
victions and 1 acquittal. A total of ,731, 
costs »ere imposed. i re were 6 cases 
regulations, 7 ccses involving violations on 

, . violations of the fish! -ion , 

account of defacing the hot springs and < ons, 

assault and 1 case of drunken and disor 

POST OFFICE DER 

Contract delii ' stations 
the beginning of the 1928 tourist seasr , 
namely, in Hamilton's general stores at Old I 
Outlet and i , 

Canyon Junction, and in the 
camp. These were com i up by a Star Rou1 r : 



Yellowstone Park Trans tion Cc , ys tern ha > 

reat improvement over the carrier service in < 
The receipts from the new stations indicate i is jus- 

tified. 

DEPARTMENT OF THE IN. 

Honorable Jo] . . rds, A istant S' py of t 

spent about ten da c /s in t ( ark in ai^ast. 

Director Stephen .'. ther was in the ar] r 15 

again in July 1928 . ie accompanied the sub-committee of * 
Senate Public Lands Committee. 

•. ... S. Demara; , ..ssistant to the Director, spent 
of .. st in the Yellowstone. 

Ceolopical Surve;, ;- The usual inspections of water • I - 
tions were made ; the summer by a member of the Boise office. 

TREASURY DEPAP. ' ) 

flfcfelic Hea lt h Service :- Mr. H. 3. Hommon, Sanit. p; ineer in 
■ of sanitation nutters in the national p..rks, visited Yell - 
stone during the summer and gave advice on sanitation .-.nd improvement 
of camp grounds. 7:>e Public Health Service continued to keep an as- 
sistant surgeon in the park to aid in safi 1th. . p. 
C. ^nderson of North Dakota was appointed to this po:itlon, P. 
R. R. Brady. Dr. H. S. Cumming, Surgeon General of the Pu :th 
Service, came into the p;.rk on August 27 to attend t - d- 
ical Association Convention. 

DEPARTMENT OF AGRIC1 LTURE 

.. ■ p ireau:- In March Mr. E. H. tcher 
Observ r ., Mr. Glen Jefferson,. 

•- Dr. J. C. Evend 
Lee of the Bu m&de two 
- to look over insect infestation cor.dit 

_ _is-- Dr. L. I. . " r » 

Sar. sco, . fore con: penc - 

jects. 

-h 

___ _ _ _ 

ridition • 

black spott . ... 

p ;a rid 2,902, 



points outside the park totaled 10,614, . rvisor C. F. 

Culler was in charge of ' work. 

HOSPITAL RVICE 

Dr. Geo. A. Windsor, operating the Yell > 8t - at 

he dqu.rters, reports the following cases cared for: 46 accidents 
(20 minor, 26 major); 29 surgic i oper lions (14 minor, 15 riv-jor); 
13 conti.^ious; 95 sick. .t. total of 5,6*0 were treated in the hotel 
I c^mp dispensaries. There were 5 deaths in t 

DONATIONS 

The sum of £119,000 w^.s donated by the Laura Spi ocke- 
feller Memorial for educational work, ,112,010 to he used for t 
building, equipping and furnishing of museums >.nd. ,.6,000 for the ex- 
penses of the committee on museums in national parks. 

For continu .tion of roadside cleanup, by public spirited friend 
in the East, ; ;6,222.26. 

For construction of fish h.-tchery at Lake, donated by 
Corey, steel executive, )15,000. 

Two b..dgers from S. M-nion, Firth, Idaho. 

Two white tail deer from D. E. Pettis, State Game Warden of 
krizon . 

Fine collection of old Pictures by . . Jac non, officia] • hoto- 
her for i ie early Hay den surveys. 

cial binder for libr ry copies , 

Silvernail of San Francisco. 

ynes, as usual, gave mac). tui' 

in servir. . A.ctin .-ector of the Yellowstone 

SEN " : 3LIC LhHDS C 

ix sub-com • of the Senate Public L btee, ;ed 
of ■' tor P. Nye, and 

ck, Clerk of bee, 

Cod. , Vyoming on July 19. T on 

the propos . I p. vise the east 

. ly no opposition '. 

•vting adjourned It was unonimoa Ly 
justinents should be made. On the 22nd I 

ming, . . . • : 76 to l 

Teton I 

as the Grr.nd bional Park. A 

lowing morn: len 



22 

Committee then toured the park, leaving via Gfi.rdi.ner on the 26th. Judg- 
ing from the unanimity of favorable opinion ex at Cody and J 
son it vould appear t the next session of Congress I 
be little difficulty in securing legislation to adjust the boundaries 
of Yellowstone Park and create the Grand Teton National Pa] . 

HOUSE PUBLIC LANDS COMMITTEE 

On July 30 a sub-commi ttee of the House Committee on :- .ds 
visited the Bechler River section of Yellowstone ^ari:. It was composed 
of Acting Chairman Smith .and Congressmen Winter, Leavitt, Evans of 
Montana, Yon, White, Colton, Letts and Hoc r, ad George Hossick the 
clerk. United States Senator John Thomas of Idaho also accompanied 
the Committee. Subsequently the party visited the park inspecting its 
headquarters, roads and hotels and other public facilities, and left 
via Cody on August 2nd. 

EDUCATIONAL COMMITTEE 

The following members of a special committee appointed by the 
Secretary of the Interior to make a survey of the educational work 
in connection with the national parks and monuments visited the Yel- 
lowstone during the summer and uade a very thorough study of the ed- 
ucational possibilities, selected museum sites, etc.: Dr. John C. 
Merriam, Dr. Frank R. Oastler, Dr. II. C. Rumpus, Dr. r Id C. 
3ryant, Ansel Hall. The members held meetings for several days, 
beginning July 2, and inspected the educational possibilities at the 
various park points. Mr. Ferruccio Vitale, a representative of I 
Fine Arts Commission, was in the park with this committee, and f r- 
nished a complete report regarding landscape matters and museum 
sites. Shortly after the departure of this committee from the park, 
work on the museum at Old Faithful w • n under the airection 
of Herber* ' r, Architect for the i-.ssociation. 



The Superintendent was away from Yeliov.sto. rforming 
!es as Assistant Director (Field) from Novi ber 12, ' to J 

5, . , and the park was in charge of the Act j tei lent, 

■ , Ls absence the as .t to the Sur rinl 
Jos f Te. 




::c. : - . | 

Dedicated ' . 1903 .• 

"For The Benefit Arid Enjoyment Of 



. 



ADDITIONAL TRAVEL FIGURES CONTINUED FROM PAGE FOl"R 



AUTOMOBILES BY ENTRANCE AND EXIT C. 





Exit G>- beway 




Entrance 


NORTH 


V.'EST 


EAST 


• sou'::: 


Tctal Cars 
Entering Bark 


North 


3,578 


4,074 


: 4,2.?7 




12,72ft 


West 


4,009 : 


6,9^7 


6,924 


2,466 . 


20,.- 6 


East ; 


4,. 12'j : 


. ( 


4,226 ! 


3,3! 3 


18,. . 


South 




1,952 


• ? 1 AP • 


7' 1 • 


! ,6! . 


Total 


• 13,54-: 


, 


. 17 RAfi 
- ' > ■ ■ 


",. ■' . 


57,077 



Pre-season cars, unclassified 

-.L, all cars and motorcycles. 



1.] 
,186 



Note: Passengers are not counted as i it, 

but '.he approximate number of passengers may be obtained by mult - 
plying the number of cars by 3.16, the aven n mber < I ->ns 
per car entering the park. 






RAIL TRAVEL BY EL'TWJCE AND EXIT ''.. 





■Korth- 












class- 






est 




:Tot 


;ge 


.. (St 


Gallatin 


^e 






Yellovstone 


: Gateway 
38 


nan 
■ 20 


•East 


•South 


:ified 




\ rth 


1 , 660; 


65 3 


, 14 


! 13, I 1 


. 3t 


















. st Yel- 


• 452' 


11,368 


269 


6 


. . 7 


: 7 


:1,4. 


: 17,408 


low stone 


















Gallatin 


















Gateway 


19 


• 


: 1,833 


C 


. 





- 2! 


3,33' 


Bozenu-.n 






: 1 


7 






16 


• 


East 


[2,55! 


: 2,393 


173 i 


106 , 


, 


11 


• 212 


, 37 


So. • 


. 


: 21 








Total 


















Exit 


















Vis itors 


:4,725 


: 15,177 


! 2,. 


139 ; 


. 


. 


, . 


I 4 . 



NOTE: The unclassif ied column is ace 'or as : 
employ ies of the Government urA P 

ces si oners 

. eous and dead he^d tr . 



mclassified , • 



S -'.-. rSM ENT S H0-IK 3 nJIC.VCr'ILK TEA 
BY STATES SEASON OF 1928 








".'01 


•th : 


..'e 


3 t 


East : 


: 


To v.. 


ST^TE : 




Pass- : 




Pass- : 




1- : 




>- : 




- 




Cars : 


enters : 


Cars : 


engers : 


C P8 : 


r : 


C<-rs : 


en 


Cars : 




Jfeuna : 


12: 


43: 


15: 


56: 


20: 


84: 


11: 


. : 


. : 


219 


isona : 


4 6 : 


120: 


93: 


310: 




139: 


19: 


51: 


207- 


620 


lansaa : 


9: 


28: 


23: 


75: 


59: 


191: 


1C « 


: 


126; 


' . 


.ifornia : 


1210: 


3439: 


3483: 


10970: 


1208: 


3619: 


. •. : 




6 




^rado : 


197: 


581: 


340: 


1045: 


1038: 


3289: 


461: 


1471: 


2056: 


386 


itiecticut : 


21: 


60: 


22: 


59: 


63: 


186s 


8: 


20: 


114: 


325 


Uware : 


7: 


19: 


4: 


8: 


3: 


7: 


1: 


2: 


15: 




I;, of Col. : 


25: 


80: 


28: 


81: 


47; 


145: 


9: 


25: 


109: 


. 


irida : 


38: 


110: 


58: 


172: 


97: 


279: 


24: 


79: 


217: 


640 


Ria : 


10: 


29: 


26: 


92: 


12: 


33: 


10: 


24' 


58. 




.0 : 


220: 


686: 


3203: 


12083: 


113: 


373: 


444: 


. 


3980 


14777 


no is : 


498: 


1542: 


413: 


1144: 


1597: 


4889: 


267; 


847 


2775 


,;?2 


..ana : 


136: 


435: 


185: 


606: 


387: 


1217: 


77- 






191 


, 


369: 


1190: 


282: 


893: 


1120: 


3640: 


167; 


538: 


1. ■ 


6261 


as : 


155: 


509: 


271: 


923: 


717: 


2412: 


318: 


1065 


1461 




: 
\ 3 iana : 


11: 


36: 


42: 


136: 


70: 


238: 


12: 


37; 


135 




11: 


35: 


29: 


92: 


61: 


206: 


18: 


54: 


LIS 






13: 


38: 


5: 


12: 


13: 


46 


5: 


11 


36« 


■ 


. r.d : 


20: 


67: 


19: 


56- 


45: 


147 




25' 


92« 




f achasetts ! 


50: 


143: 


45: 


137: 


130: 


352: 


31: 


92' 


256: 




an : 


268: 


767: 


247: 


7S2 


725: 


2195' 




256: 


i; 


40 


esota 


719: 


2262: 


210: 


641' 


771: 


2387: 




127 


l' 


,17 


sippi 


19 


58: 


16: 


57 


20: 


30' 


8: 


22' 






ixri 


! 118' 


343. 


: 253: 


812 


644: 


2153 


194: 


629 


1209« 


. 




, 3174 


10615 


: 1802' 


6189 


■ 943 


• : . 






6 


: 20. 


<a. 


: 242 


: 803 


232 


781 


> 1145 


: 3810 


275: 


869 


l 


ez 


tU 


: 31 


: 95 


- 135 


418 


22 


67 


8: 








7 shire 


: 5 


: 17 


10 


28 


13 




3, 


15 


. 






: 67 


: 188 


: 82 


: 246 


! 145 


427 






. 




Mexico 


20 


: 60 


36 


: 120 


62 


198 










>rk 


: 234 


: 659 


: 215 


621 


: 523 


- 1. 






: 1 


. 


-rolina 


: 12 


: 35 


: 21 


69 


: 25 


. 


: 6 


. 






te-kota 


: 497 


: i" 


'. 122 


: 401 


: 228 




: 17 




. 


• 




: 261 


: 804 


. 


; 1110 


• 764 


: 2283 






: 1! 






: 124 


: 


: 223 


: 755 


. 


: 1 




. 


: 


: 




: 24 ') 


: 734 


: 913 


: 2816 


: 


: 


: 


: 


: 


: 


Lvania 


: 140 


: 436 


: 239 


: 


: 383 


: 1141 


: 


: 


: 


: 


Island 


: 


: 32 


: 8 


: 28 


: 17 


■ 


: 1 




: 


: 


rolina 


: 5 


: 18 


: 


: 8 


: 


: 


. 


. 


: 


: 


>ta 


: 212 


: 


i 


: 329 


: 468 


: L! 


: 


: 


: 


: 


ee 


: 24 


: 79 


: 


: 141 


: 35 


: 11? 


: 


: 


: 


: 



s; _. i f. f ING aU .\ • _ 

BY _ . . . 

Tcoi.- 



26 



ST. 



Am 



US 

11 

■nont 

•;inia 

ton 
|; Virginia 
i:ons in 

K . .- 

..da 
ii 

1 Zone 
i Lne Is, 

ign 

T A L S 



North 



Cars 



135 

170 

1 

16 
772 

12 

429 

222 

2 

453 



11710 



Pass- 
ers 



417 

462 

6 

55 

2328 

38 

1319 

644 

7 

1584 

28 

10 



36829 




Cars 



326 
2634 

2 

15 

1015 

29 

142 

240 

5 

I . 

22 

7 

1 



184 69 



111b 

. ■ 

2 

57 

3107 

87 

449 

766 

9 

682 

70 

21 

2 



61982 



6 
88 
8 

. 

38 

607 

1571 

1 

160 

6 

5 



17823 



2017 
245 

. 

1843 

4 

560 

16 

18 



56799 



South 






241 
. 

1 
4 

87 
7 

V. 

759 

1 

24 
6 
1 
1 






- 



. 
2 

. 
2545 

2 






• 



JRCYCLES TOUR IE G 











. 




. 


n: 




. 










: 






. 










. 


• 












■ 


l 




. 





Cars entering second trip unclassified by states 

Motorcycles entering unclassified by st a1 

Pre-season travel unclassified by state? 

) TOT.-.: - Ul cars and passengers, classified and i 



' 


1926 




nee 


1 




Arrow 






Clevel 







lsior 






ridson 


107 


• 


Henderson 


16 




Indii 






7 ) T A L S 


14 6 








1 


















TOUR ISTS 

Classified by SI 








i 


■th : 


Wes 


>t : 


Ee 


tat : 


Sol 


ith : 


: 








! STATE : 


Entrance : 


Entr 


: 

Carr.p : 


Entrance : 




ince : 






Htls: 


Camp: 


Htls: 


Htls: 


' : 


Htls: 


: 


: 


: 






ana : 


9: 


26: 


39: 


6P : 


11: 


■ : 




: 5: 




. : 






ona : 




5 * 


9: 


7: 


2: 


6: 








! 






■ r.s a s ! 


6: 


1: 


1 : 


12: 


22: 


15: 




: 




. : 






fornia : 


: 


100: 


933: 


623: 


87: 


82: 


4: 


3: 


: 


: 




1 06 


i radr : 


20: 


14: 


39: 


43: 


71: 


79: 




. . 


. : 


: 




! 


recti cut : 


68: 


57: 


137: 


26: 


60: 


24: 




: 11: 


11: 


! 




. 


iiiare : 


6: 


6: 


31: 


20: 


6: 


2: 




: 




■ 






| . of Col. : 


67: 


25: 


191: 


71: 


13: 


53: 


1: 


: 15: 


13: 


: 






^ r 


29: 


16: 


61: 


41: 


25: 


23: 




: 1: 


• 






I 


*1&> ' 


18: 


13: 


56: 


119: 


Li : 


23: 




1: 6: 










: 


5: 


2: 


: 


j • 


8: 


3: 














: 


9: 


6: 


39: 


17: 


3: 




2: 


: 8; 


: 


61: 






lois : 


1181: 


931: 


984: 


777: 


431: 


601: 




1 : • 


: 


. 






[..ma : 


187: 


162: 


174: 


213: 


65: 


128: 


4: 


: 


■ 










105: 


96: 


76: 


113: 


49: 


171: 


2: 


7: 










L ; 


24: 


48: 


39: 


31: 


33- 


1 . ■ 


2: 


: 


7 : 


: 




. 


- 


53: 


34: 


86: 


131: 


29: 






: 21: 


: 


• 






:.a : 


20: 


15: 


63: 


63: 


12: 


14: 




: 20: 


1: 


: 








12: 


5: 


20: 


: 




3: 




: 




: 






: 


113: 


32; 


162- 


72: 


44. 






: 


11: 


• 






:-etts : 


261: 


91: 


214: 


69- 


. 


117: 




: 24: 


• 


. : 






*r. 


223: 


147: 


202: 


169: 


94- 


129> 




: 




: 






,ta 


281: 


477: 


20: 


25: 


36' 


98 




: 




• 






: 


5- 


6: 


20: 


34: 


12: 


12 




: 


1: 


: 








339: 


101: 




68: 




221 




1: 


: 


. 








84: 


61: 


5 


8: 


11 


• 17 




. : 






- 






20: 


.• 


44 
1 


84 
1 


44 


. . 


1 


: 










re 


. 10 


7 


17 


3 




2 




: 










-' .. 


. 


: 133 


475 


: 147 


: 226 


: 129 




: 










• 


: 3 


5 


• 


5 


5 






: 








: 






: 608 


:1470 


: 520 


: 806 


. 


: 


: ] : 










rolina 


: 21 


: 6 


: 63 


. 


: 13 


: 8 




. 










Dta 


: 17 


• 




: 


: 


: 










: 




: 33] 


: 453 




: 874 




: . • . 




: : 


. 




: 
: 


' -• 


: 16 


: 16 


: 


: 13 


: 19 


: 




: : 








: 53 


: 29 


: 24 


: 


: 


: 6 




: : 


: 




: 




: 


: 


:1050 


! 


: . 


: . 


: 


: : 


: 


: 


: 

: : 




: 23 


: 14 


: 39 


: 21 


: 


: 11 




: : 


. 


: 


rol ina 


: 


: 


: 28 


: . • 


: 2 


: 












: 



TOUR IS:" __j-0HINC P.JiK GATEWAY S BY Rx,IL 

AMD ^ccq:.:\d..t:"".~ ^_ __ i ls awd CaJvJps 
[ Continued) 



28 





: North : 


ft est 


: East 


: South 


Gallatin 








STATE 


■Entrance : 


Entrance 


Entrance 


[Entrance 


•Entrance 


TOG 


?AL 


■ GRAND 


[1 Ls 




Irls : Camp 


Htls 


Camp 


H1 Is 


oamp 


Htls: 


Camp 


Htls: 


Camp 




k th Dakota 


5; 


4 : 








6 






26: 


11 


• 31: 


24 


55 


iiessee 


: 29: 


19: 


60, 


6! 


21 


12 






8: 


*"£ 


118: 


100; 


218 


■ 


. 77; 


51: 


123 


147: 


129 


116 


2 




o : 


2 


C37 : 


316: 


653 




10' 




77 


54: 


1 












83: 


54 


142 




4 


2: 


' 


10: 


1 


5 










11: 


17 


28 


.ia 


15: 


33: 


46 


: 32: 


14 


17 




2 


: 'x . 


14 


79: 


98: 


177 


ton 


134 


120: 


15 


• 14 


26 


: . 






77: 


85 


252: 


242 


494 


i rginia 


36: 


• 23: 


34 


42: 


9: 


5 






11: 


5: 


90: 


75; 


165 


sin 


■ 155: 


178: 


209: 


-:20: 


63: 


100 


r? 


, i 


140: 


170 


570: 


673 


1243 


: .. :. 


9: 


2- 


15 


8- 


12: 


2<r 


1 


, ; 


4 : 




41: 


39' 




6222: 


4677: 


8139 


5774: 


3515: 


3609 


40: 


66: 


1587: 


1664, 


19 503: 


15790; 


35293 



3Y FOREIGN COUi. TRIES 







1 




















: 1: 


iralia 


2 






4 
















: : 


ric* : 


1: 






3 












: 2 


: 1 


: 5: 


lum 


3, 




3 
















: 6 




1& 


21' 


60 


23 


28 


: 16 


: 5 




2 


29 


5 


: 89 


: 100: 


i 


5 


2 


1 
3 


3 
4 




2 






4 




: 10 


: 7 : 
: 4: 


3slavu.kia 


5- 




















: 6 




. rk : 




3 


1 
















: 1 


: 3: 


■st Indies 








2 
















: 2: 




25 


14: 


21' 


3 


6 


3 








: 2 


> KO 


: 3: 
: 23: 


3 


1: 




5 


1 




1 










6 


: 2: 


V 


10. 


6 


18 
2« 


8 


4 


3 






3 


. 3 


as 

2 


: 20: 


..i 


2 


2 


3 

8' 












1 




6 


: 1: 
2: 




- 

6 




6 
2; 


3: 


Is 


1 






■r 




17 
2 


: 


a 






c ' 
















■ 




: 

tia 
ind 




Is 

2 






2: 








2: 


2 




2: 
1: 
2: 
2: 

! 


, lico 
»i 


5 




. 





















29 



T0U.U ST3 _ _ I ___ _ v _ __ RAIL 

("Cont'd] 





". pth 


: ..est 


East 


: South 


Latin 










Entrance 


[Entrance 


Entrance 


:Entr; 




Lee 


ITA1 


: GIv. 




; - ; ? 


• : 


:- r t. 




' La 


' .-; 


Htls 


Camp 


Htls 




Htls 






.-.-. 






2 
















2 




2 


- T* - 


l 




















1 




1 


Sand 




1 




4 




1 






1 


1 


1 


7 


• 


tth ^frica 




3 

1 


2 
2 


: 1 




1 










2 
2 


2 


6 

! 


»tieri.".nd 


3 




CT 


1 














6 


1 


: 7 


H America 


2 


4 


• 11 




2 
3 


3 








. 


13 
5 


7 


20 
8 


H& Islands 




















3 




3 


." 




2 






2 














o 
C 


2 




l ■• 


95 


1C6 


12.3 


70 


• 34 


• 25 




2: 


*x'x 


21 


296 


224 


520 


Hfied 




























KRAVEL 


6.317 


4783 


R262 


:5844 


. . , . 


3634 


40: 


6P: 




1685 


...•;. OH 35813 



■sified, 



* 



G R A N D TO T 



41697 



■eludes 256 rail visitors who entered the ;.ark via the Bozeman terminus of 
tiern Pacific Railw .y .nd 2897 temporary . J es of the Government and j 
Hsioners. 



_ _ _ _ _ ■ _ _ ■ 
YELLO..ST " 



an 
t or. 

• 

tte 
: 



1^26 



2 

1 

. 

38 

54 

C 

16 



1927 : 








• 




2 ! 


! 












. 


■ 




f 






21 






87 


172 






! 664 




1 








: 8< 




8 






• 


• 









27 




Chr. . r 


} 


20 


: 21 


Clever. nd 


i . 


. L7 


• 


Oe. 




■ 


2 


CoJ 




. 


. 


els 


1 


, 












Di :•: 


1 


1 












Dort 




. 




Du.3 


1 






■ 


] 












1 



. - 

St-.rn.RI) :._.•:.: .. : BILES JRIVKN FHROUGH YELL0..ST0I.2 NATIONAL P«RK (Continued) 



K.'iME 


l l . ; 26 


1927 


192P: 


KJvIE 


• J. '26 


27 


: 192fi 


fin : 


11 


4 ! 


0: 


Mo or lend 





]_ 


: J 


; ei : 


1125 s 


145 7 


8049: 


Nash 


: 1377 


: 1815 


i 2051 


:20n Knight ; 


: 


2 : 


: 


National 


8 


1 


: 1 


tat : 


126 


107 


81: 


Oakland 


611 


: 707 


: 641 


ti ! 


977-; 


83(9 


7416: 


• Oldsmobile 


: 682 


1043 


: 1392 


1 in : 


336 : 


362 : 


431 : 


Overland 


• 1092 , 


• 1184 


: 651 


nr : 


: 


I ; 


C : 


Pontiac 


108 


: 514 


: 1323 


uair. : 


3 : 


2 : 


: 


Packard 


• 590 


• 809 


: 1035 


rc. 


2 : 


2 ■ 


1 : : 


Pan-American 


: 1 


1 


: 


; 


5 ; 


3 : 


2 : 


Patterson 


: 1 


1 


: 


! 


24 : 


16 ■ 


1 : 


Peerless 


104 


- 108 


: 


: es : 


61 : 


24 ; 


2 : : 


Pierce-Arrow 


• 121 


• 149 


: 147 


. Stutz ; 


5 : 


1 : 


C : : 


Pilot 


1 


1 


G 


: es : 


: 


: 


1 : 


• Premier 


9 


: 4 


: 3 


:or. ! 


L325 : 


14FC : 


1663 : : 


Reo 


314 ; 


321 


: 565 


"le : 


795 : 


801 : 


10e5 : ! 


Republic 


: 


1 


: 


lional : 


7 i 


10 : 


3 : 


Rickehbacker 


120 


119 


: 6 


1 ina : 


: 


? . 


: 


Roamer 


1 ■ 


3 





iBry 


2 : 


! 


: 


Rolls-Royce 


1 : 


7 





. 


535 : 


400 




Rollin 


15 : 


6 


: 1 


W l 1 ^ ' 


115 : 


135 i 


141 : : 


{ & V Khi 


2 : 


3 






2 : 


: 


: 


Star 


1000 : 


1127 


1243 


Jar : 


28 : 


38 


: 


Saxson 


1 « 


1 


1 


: 


! 


4 • 


: ; 


Scrips-Booth 


6 : 


. 





ft»ette 


13 ! 


6 


: 


Sheridan 


1 i 





f 


t zn 


19 


10 : 


: 


Standard 


2 • 


1 





• 


12 


4 


: 


Stanley Steamer- 


« 


1 





; In 


246 


284 : 


. ■ . : : 


Steams-Knight 


25 : 


31 


7 


| 


12 : 


26 


C : 


Stewart 


1 i 








lir 


1 : 


2 ! 


• 


Stevens : 


24 ! 


25 





■ 




58 - 


224 : 


Stevens-Luryea < 


1 : 


! 





i 





4 : 


: 


Studebak r : 


2170 ; 


2462 : 


2618 




120 


! 182 


312 : 


Stutz : 


22 : 


60 , 


3 


fell 


40 7 


: 274 


203 : 


Say^rs 


: 


1 





.iin 


12 


2 


: 


■ Templar 


7 : 


2 : 


1 


r.i 


1 





1 : 


Velie 


78 : 




20 


- • 


4 


3 


C : 


Xinton : 


6 : 


. 





t 


1 





: 


. Llys-Khight 


.13 : 


1145 s 


2012 


Bmi 


24 


: 1 


: : 


' llys-Six 


1 : 


2 ■ 






: 73 


67 


4 : 


IV. -St. ' Lr 


32 : 


32 ; 


17 


1 • 


: 2 





: 


•ocott : 


9 : 


. : 


f 


me cms 


: 


•20 


: 696 : 


: te : 


■ 


: 


T 



Total Classified 4 •: 

Secrndti"-, ...classified 285 

Pre-season cars, unclass 

TOT . ... - "58035" 

torcycles 



31 

SPECIAL VIS J 7 015 TV V.:' L P'.. STONE Iw'TIOlA L PARK IN 1928 
T? SIRgD TO ON P^GS TWO) " 

The entire population of the State of Wyoming moved into Yellowstone 
National Pari: during the summer of 1928. At least, the Nation's play- 
ground was the host to more people than inhajit this wonderful state of 
the West. iVhile Wyoming's population at the last census was given as 
194,402, the final figures for the season just closed show that 230,984 
people visited and enjoyed the marvelous canyon of the Yellowstone, the 
awe-inspiring geysers, the beautiful hot springs and pools and the many 
other features for which this region is famous. 

This figure of 230,984 for 1928, which was a record-breaker, as has 
been each ^receding season si.:ce 1919, the year following the close of 
the orld ".'ar, includes a great many prominent people of the world. Five 
United States Senators, 13 United States Congressmen and the Governors of 
three states, in spite of the fact that this was a presidential election 
year, e - .:. the park visitors. 

Zven before the park was officially opened on June 20 and the 
lodges and* hotels wore ready to take care of guests, two very prominent 
persons had an opportunity to view the park features and witness the 
: . de to got things in readiness for the more than 
230,000 visitors who were to follow. Rear Admiral Phomas J. Senn, 
U. 3. X., with his wife and son, were the first 1928 visitors. This 
part;- - = in at the west gate- on May 25 and left via the sam I way 
er.route to San Diego, where Admiral S >s to take charge of the 
Pacific Coast destroyers. On the 28th Miss Lena Madesin Phillips, Pres- 
ident of the Business and Profes ional v.ornens' Club, came in at the 
west gate and made a hurried trip through the park enroutc to Sheridan, 
mill , where she was to attend a convention of the Club for the State 
of Wyoming. 

Lth the formal opening ceremonies at West Yellowstone, the west 
entrance to t r , on June 20, many well lmov;n hereon.. 
making their ap • • ;-. Carl R. Gray, Presid I the Union ?aci 
System, H. C. Baler , -nor of Idaho, George . - rn, Governor 
of Utah, L. L. Calloway, Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Lion tan , 
Addison T. Smith, United States r ' n from Idaho, nd Chief 

Tendoy, of the Shoshone Indian Tribe were the principal speak ra 
th; oration, while H. A. Scandr- I , c ident of the Chic. (Mil- 
waukee an L St. ] ro,.d was in attend . • . 

Dr. R. i " r, otcd Nov/ Yor ■ -nd conservationist, 
Dr. K. C. Bumpus, of th .. rican Associ tion of . , p. John 
, President of th- Car -it tion e: ■ * ,..'., 
consti tuti : I .rig thi • ' ' . 

ion , [) c nt the l.t* - it of J ome time in Jul; 
par*. . L organizing; work to 1 

along ■.duc.tio; Lines. ted in .by 

rruccio v: , 
co-.- try, n. 



32 

Oth^r June rr v Is wore Harvey S. Firestone, President of the Pi] - 
stone Tire Company, nd his sons Harvey, Junior, Director of the comp 

. Vice President of the Firesto: e plant tions in Liberia, ..nd Leonard, 
Vice President of the Firestone Tire .-.nd liubb^r Company of C.lifornj ; 
Frank L. Folk, Director of the Northern P .cific R ii. y nd Acting Sec- 
retary of St. tc. from December 1918 to July 1919, under President Wilson's 
administration; William L. Cider, former United St. tes Sen tor from Few 
York; Blair '• . - ; '- id, Director of the ' \ fork Zoologic 1 P rk; C; 

-.. I , Assistant to the Director of the Budget; Victor Ro ■ I r, 
: . ous author and joum. list, formerly editor of the Omaha Bee; Dr. 
Prank G. Crane, President of Wyoming University; Dr. V/allace Krugler, 

York physician and conservationist; FL.rry J. Denney, President of 
the Duluth Chapter of the Izaak V/alton League of America and a lc.dcr 

. conservation matters in the- Midwest; Ernest F. McGregor, Governor of 
the New England Kiwanis; James Carmichael, one of the le..din u Rotarians 
of EngL.nd; and a party of German officials on Hygiene, I th :xd Pub- 
lic Utilities, who were making a tour of the United States inspecting 
saniti r; sures. 

month of July brought into the park two very import. .nt com- 
mittees of Congress. On July 20, United States Sen.'. tors Gerald P. Nye, 
of North D.kota, Ch irm n, John B. Kendrick of './yoming, Porter H. Dale 

'.' rmc t . : ry F. Ashurst of Arizona., composing a sub-committee 
of the U. S. Senate Public Lands Committee, untered at t st g^.to 

I left via Gardiner, the north gate, on the 24th, Lg made a 
thorough inspection of the p-.rk activities. They also conducted hear- 

t Cody and Jackson, 'yoming, in the interest of revising the 
boundaries of the p .rk and with a view to giving the splendid Teton 
mountains, south of the Yellowstone, a national park status. On July 
31 the following members of the House Public Lands Committee came into 
the park I I Lowstone, following an inspection of the Bechl - 
Lver section or southwest cor:, r, hich Idaho farming interests d^si: 
'r i th :• for irrigation purposes: Honorable Addison 
T. Smith of Idaho, lc Lng Chairman; C. . : . i ter of './yoming; Scott 
Leavitt and John ". vans of Montana, Don B. Colton of :; S. Harrison 
'..hite of Colorado; . . Letts of Tov/a; Jose ) . r of Fie 
and Tc ... Sfon o r Flori . ble John Thomas, Lted States Senator 
fro- o, ace p1 into the soi . - r ie 

iat this nt in the Yellc budied the 

conditio: Government and perk visitors. Edwara 

fiord, National Commander of the American I . for 1928, made a 
hurried trip from I >n Hole coun! r; 

^te Public La littee was he. . J Ly visi ;ors 

iacluded: '<_ . . . Jtone, Associate Justic 

• ; ' >hen T. , r of 1 
Service; Lly, Pr sident of • Mori ■ : ic Ra : y; 

ward, Pr nt of the Chicago, Or' y; Dr. 

. - . , Oirector of the r 

'itution; Lorn, author and bic r, on 

oosevelt wor. . ; . . . , of 

■ ncetc: r School of G •. 

Colonel D. ' . ainlan, Special I to the 



. : 

;thers Bart, well known author and Saturday Evening Post Writer, whose 
book "The Dude Wrangler" brought into prominence the duae ranches of the 
West; C. Watt Brandon, Editor of the Sheridan, Wyoming, Journal; Thomas 
Sterling, former United States Senator from South Dakota and Counsel for 
the U. S. Senate Public Lands Committee; R. H. Alcorn, President of the 
Wyoming Editorial Association and director of the National Editorial 
Association; R. W. Cl^rk, General Traffic Manager of the Northern Pacific 
Railway; Robert C. Sproul, Vice President of the University of California; 
Theodore 0. Joslin, newspaperman and Washington correspondent for the 
Bopton Transcript; Randall H. Hagner, realty operator and Director of the 
Riggs National Bank of Washington, D. C; Honorable Herman S. Dike, Jus- 
tice of the Supreme Court of New York; K. A. Rhodes, President of the 
Rainier National Park Company of Mt. Rainier National park; L. R. Van 
Meter, General Traffic Manager of the American Telephone and Telegraph 

lany of New York City; Stephen Birch, President of the Kennecott Cop- 
per Corporation; and Major E. Parker West, Governor of the United States 
Soldiers Home cf Washington, D. C. 

The month of August saw two important conventions held in the park, 
that of the Tri-State Medical Associations, comprising Montana, Wyoming 
and Idaho, which was held at the Canyon Hotel on the 27, 28 find 29, and 
the American Chiropractic Association, held at Mammoth Lodge on the 28, 
29 and 7>0. These conventions brought in prominent men from all parts of 

3 -c. try, including Dr. H. S. Cumming, Surgeon General of the U. S. 
Public Health Service; Dr. W. J. Mayo, of the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, 
.nesota; Dr. '.. 3. Thayer, President Elect of the American Medical 
Association; Dr. Geo. A. Soper, Managing Director for the Control of 
Cancer, New York City; Dr. Dean Lewis, Surgeon in Chief for Johns Hop- 
kins Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland; Dr. Donald C. Balfour of the Mayo 
Clinic, and several other doctors and surgeons ranking v> ry high in 
their profession. Other prominent visitors during the month included: 
Ion. Johi . Sdw&rds, Assistant Secretary of the Interior; Governor C. 

. 3nerson, of Wyoming; Honorable Jonothan M. Y/ainv. fight, U. S. Con- 
gressman from Lew York; Hon. C. 3. Hudspeth and I'on. Guinn WJ.lli.jns, 

. S. Congressmen from Texas; Major General James G. Harbcrd, former 
Chief of Staff of 'J. S. i-.rmy o.nd President of thr . lio 

Corpor .tion of A : ; . v ' I '. Blair, U. S. Commission r )f int. rnal 
Revenue; G r . r, Jr., President of 1 Bank of 

York Cit; : r. ad, Director of . S. Reclamation S 
vice; Mark Sullivan, au1 , istorian and nc r , aitor 
of Collier's Weekly from 1912 to 1917; ./. C. : rd, -.g Editor 
of the Denver Post; F. . iiliam3on, Ea : r ident of the Bur- 
lingtoi ; renc . betson, ■ rvationist and C r 'we 

ne Development Commission, Bangor, Li ; . rt J. rdette, 
clubwoman and one of the foremost leaders of women in the co ry; 

.1 Cour' yley Coop r, thors I rs for thi 
urday Evening Post and other leadi] i; B. B. Brooks, it 

of ' Bunk, Caa r, rig, and former Got rnor of 

the st • ; .- pe, Editor t ion's Bus in ; . r, 
id~nt of ■ nnsylvania Board of G m M. 

3. Rei3, Vice ;-,nt of the Commission; Dr. ... 
Geology, Cor:. rsity; rs. . . dow of tain G. C. 
Do- bo 1 3tone with * - ford Party of 

1370; Lester . rdncr, Presidtnl , . : 



34 

Dr. E. 3. Mc Daniel, President of the Oregon State Motor Association and 
Director of the American automobile Association; Sir Reginald Patterson, 
British Financial advisor to the Egyptian Government; Henry Dennison, 
President of the Dennison Manufacturing Company; Mrs. John T. McCutcheon, 
wife of the famous cartoonist for the Chicago Tribune; Joel D. Hunter, 
General Superintendent of the United Charities of Chicago; Edwir. . 
Berolzheimer, President of the Eagle Pencil Company, and ..'illiam C. 
Gregg, car manufacturer of Hackensack, I. r ev; Jersey and one of the lead- 
ing conservationists of the country. 

The month of September alv.'ays sees a falling off in travel, and 
this ye^r was no exception. V/hile the travel during the month of 
August averaged 2765 visitors each day, there was an average of less 
than 1000 a day during September. This is due to the fact that people 
are returning to their occupations, the schools call back the students 
and teachers, weather conditions become uncertain and the hotels, 
lodges and transportation line cease operations on the 20th. However, 
in spite of these conditions there are always those who are anxious to 
view the park in its fall colors, when it is really most beautiful, and 
to see and photograph the animals which corue down from the higher eleva- 
tions. Among the lute visitors this year were: Mrs. Duvelle Vest 
Johnson, siste:- of Secretary of the Interior Honorable Roy 0. West; 
Honorable Burton L. French, U. S. Congressman from Idaho; Major General 
Hugh L. Scott, noted Indian fighter and exponent of the sign language; 
Mrs. Mary Roberts Rineh^rt, renowned author and playwright; Alfred H. 
Swayne, Vice President of the General Motors Corporation; Mrs. Charles 
S. Deneen, wife of the U. S. Senator from Illinois; Joseph Mines, former 
U. S. Congressman from Ohio; Dr. Florence Lov.ther, Professor of Zoology 
at Barnard College; Frank P. Condit, Vice President of the Guarantee- 
Title & Trust Company of New York City; Dr. H. H. Kerr, prominent sur- 
geon of Washington, D. C; Allan Jackson, Director and Vice President 
of the Standard Oil Company of Indiana; N. G. Naylor, Vice Fresident 
of the Midwest Refining Company of Denver; General Burke Sinclair, Gen- 
eral Manager of the Hughes Oil Company of Billings, Montana; and Frank 
L. Cochran, Manager of the Standard Oil Company of Indian:, from Minne- 
apolis. The Montana and r/yoming Bankers Associations met at Old Faith- 
ful en September 3 and 4 and the Directors of the Western Dude Ranchers 
Association met at the same pl<_ce on the 4th. 

Finally, after all the park operations were closed LJid pr : ! lly 
every employee had departed, Will H. Hays, czar of the movie world, 
paid a visit to this wonderl-nd to view and photogr wild Ls. 
He witnessed a buffalo round-up, such as few people in this country have 
ever observed, and secured some excellent motion pictures. P. Hays I 
come to Wyoming to participate in a hunting expedition for big game, but 
he foresook hi n Cor his camera and the results he obtained were far 

more gratifying to him, so he s ys. There is no doubt but wh I I 

3tone will remain in his mind as a suitable setting for futui 
motion picture productions.